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Thread: I need new boots

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Trinity County
    Posts
    87

    Default I need new boots

    After 10 years and about 500 outings, my Simms Freestones are done. So I need a new pair.

    I'm looking for felt soles, since I really only fish the Trinity. I was thinking of another pair of Simms since my last pair lasted so long. I'm not sure what the difference between the styles.

    So guys, any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    East Bay, CA
    Posts
    261

    Default

    Get the new Simms freestones with the felts. Throw some studs in and be done.

    See the other boot post for our opinions on the rubber soles.

    Mike
    Eat it. Eat it. Simon says EAT IT!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Trinity County
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Is there any reason to get one of the more expensive models from Simms?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    wydaho
    Posts
    862

    Default

    If you can try a bunch on, like any type of boot some will fit your particular foot better and be more comfortable.
    http://powfly.org
    Better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than to open it and remove all doubt.

    -Mark Twain

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goby View Post
    Is there any reason to get one of the more expensive models from Simms?
    yeah - the guide model uppers are mostly leather so last ALOT longer. That synthetic stuff in the cheaper models is subject to rips and cracks from occasional sharp rocks, barbed wire, sticks, abrasion, and wetting/drying cycles, where as the leather makes it through this stuff relatively unscathed. The guides weigh more, especially when wet. If you do aggressive wading, hiking, and climbing you are going to need leather. The freestones may do for many people but not for me.
    Last edited by amoeba; 03-15-2012 at 08:50 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    East Bay, CA
    Posts
    261

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by amoeba View Post
    yeah - the guide model uppers are mostly leather so last ALOT longer. That synthetic stuff in the cheaper models is subject to rips and cracks from occasional sharp rocks, barbed wire, sticks, abrasion, and wetting/drying cycles, where as the leather makes it through this stuff relatively unscathed. The guides weigh more, especially when wet. If you do aggressive wading, hiking, and climbing you are going to need leather. The freestones may do for many people but not for me.

    I have found the exact opposite with regards to leather boots. They are more resistant to wear, but I I have found they are especially susceptible to shrinkage after repeated wet/dry cycles. They are even worse after the leather gets hot (like you leave them locked in the car in Redding in August while you get a chili dog and milkshake). It's one of the reasons I abandoned wearing the leather boots and went to the "pleather". Since I don't spend 250 days a year on the water anymore, my boots get dry now and I was tired of having to soak my boots every time I wanted to fish.

    Mike
    Eat it. Eat it. Simon says EAT IT!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    126

    Default Get the Rivershed Boots

    Again the Rivershed boots are light and durable. Synthetic leather actually holds up really well. Real leather on the guides dries up and you need to soak your boots in water before you go fishing. Don't forget the star cleats. It took me a few years and many twisted ankles and broken rods to figure out that you need metal studs for all waters!!

  8. #8

    Default Patagonia

    I have worn out at least a dozen pairs of wading boots in the last 10 years of fishing...

    Simms, Hodgman, Corkers, Chota, etc...

    I recently purchased the Patagonia Riverwalker boots with studded felt soles ($120 shipped from eBay)

    I suspect they'll last several years.

    They are hands down the most comfortable, rugged, durable, grippy, and easy-to-lace boots I've ever owned.

    Mark

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    santa barbara
    Posts
    26

    Default

    I've had at least six pairs of boots, simms, chotas, patagonia, favorite so far is the Cloudveil. These can be had for cheap online and it's all around great boot

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Truckee, CA
    Posts
    323

    Default

    I have about a dozen different pairs of wading boots and I used to help maintain about 4 times that amount of gear for an outfitter. Among those, the old Simms freestones last/lasted like no other. The lifespan of the newer Simms isnt quite like what it was 15 years ago, but still better then anyone else on the market. The freestones are heavy, but they last. The lighter/nicer models generally have more stitching and/or heavy cloth like cordura,etc and thats where they fall apart. The pleather is usually pretty bomber. An old trick from my climbing buddy "Bigfly" put a small dab of aquaseal on any stitching and your boots will last even longer.

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