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Thread: V-Hull Jons Vs Flat Bottom Jons...over rated?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sonoma County
    Posts
    21

    Default V-Hull Jons Vs Flat Bottom Jons...over rated?

    Ok, let's agree that there are compromises on all boats....and maybe this is splitting hairs/bows/waves, but does anyone have experience with flat bottom (mod v bow) Jons, Vs Jons w/a V hull carried all the way to the transom?

    If so, let's talk 'degrees'
    How many degrees of 'dead rise' make an 'effective' difference in ride...and at what height of chop/waves (6", 12", 18", 24", ?)?? Is 6 degrees going make a difference in ride? 8 degrees, or does it take 11 degrees or more (when the waves/chop are how high)?

    Which begs the question about stability (not to mention additional HP to get the jon boat on 'plane' due to the v bottom Vs flat)...will it tip three or four inches when you walk to the the edge/rail (because that's the difference between the keel/centerline of the boat and the higher chine/corner at the edge of the boat) ?

    W/out two identical length, width boats...one w/a v-bottom and one flat, will we ever know

    The trade off of a 'slightly' better ride, for a more 'tippy' boat when you are fishing seems to be a no-brainer....assuming you are fishing more than you are 'riding'.... Then again....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Davis, CA, USA, Earth
    Posts
    14,214

    Default

    I have had flat bottom, 6 degree and 10 degree bottoms on my Jon boats.

    The difference between flat and 6 degrees isn't much as far as ride goes. It does help the boat turn better though.

    10 degrees is pretty good in some chop in the Delta.

    __________________________________________________ ____________________

    For a jet boat the flat bottom for rivers only has some advantages:

    1) I think they do get up faster.

    2) you can bring them in to shallower water which is great for getting in and out of, especially old guys in waders.

    **but they ride badly in the chop on open water.

    __________________________________________________ _____________________

    Some guides like the steering up front so they can see better for running rivers.

    Some guides like a 10 degree bottom on a jet boat for fast maneuvering too.
    Bill Kiene

    Semi-retired in Davis, CA

    530/753-5267

    billkiene@kiene.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Placer County
    Posts
    737

    Default

    IMO, and as Bill states, the modified Vs on the Jet Sleds are purely for better manueverability. IMO, the modified V doesn't do much, if anything at all, with regards to offering a better ride in any kind of 'chop'. Believe me, I know first hand..... I like the stability when sitting still in the water or crawling along via trolling motor, but the slight V to rearward flat bottom is not joy in rough water.

    So, why not put a jet outboard on a true V-hull? IMO, the V diverts too much water away from the intake. Hence, no water in, no propulsion.

    We face this situation of looking for multipurpose boats because we live in a region where we have both navigable riverways, lakes, deltas, bays, and ocean. It's hard to focus with so much variety, although, the decline of fisheries has narrowed the opportunities, obviously.

  4. #4

    Default

    I agree with Ocean, not much difference in ride between a flat bottom or modified v, maybe a slight difference in deflecting water for a little drier ride but not much. Didn't know they made a jon boat with a v all the way back. Aluminum boats are light, takes very little to "bounce" them and this is a light class of alum boats you are comparing. Great for rivers and calm waters, but if you value your kidneys you won't be using them much out in the open areas where it gets rough.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    East Bay, CA
    Posts
    261

    Default

    I used to drive a lot of jon boats through a lot of different water and they are not good for going through chop. The just bounce off of waves. But, then again, they were not designed to go through waves. They were designed to run through shallow water with a jet, which they do very well. But, a boat with a mod v in the bow was MUCH better that a flat jon. At least there was a little cushion from waves (albeit not much). In big water with jons, you pretty much have to angle the boat and "surf" the waves back and forth trying to keep your bow out of the trough.

    A 10 deg boat may work a bit better with an inboard due to the angle of the intakes as opposed to those on the outboard.

    Mike

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sonoma County
    Posts
    21

    Default

    I would assume a prop would do better on a flat bottom jon, in so far as turning/steering is concerned, Vs a Jet (in that you have a lot more in the water w/the engine as a skeg).

    Just trying to determine when/where the trade offs are w/a prop on a mod-v bow flat bottom jon Vs a Mod v bow jon w/a 6-8 degree v running the full length...?

    Appreciate all the great feedback so far...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Placer County
    Posts
    737

    Default

    With a prop, you'll get instant feedback when you move the steering wheel or tiller handle regardless of the degree deadrise in the hull.

    The slight deadrise being built on jet sleds reduces the 'sliding' the boat does while powered by a jet. Again, it does nothing to combat choppy water.

    In summary, if you're going to power up with a prop, you're really splitting hairs with regards to "modified V" or "flat bottom jon".

    If your concern is accessibility, think about configuring your transom height so that you can accomodate switching back and forth between lower units; that being a prop and jet.

    Best of luck.

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